life; Imagine it from the perspective of a child. Imagine that you are happily playing outside in the late summer afternoon. It's hot. The streetlights aren't quite on, but getting close. Down the street the neighbor is mowing the grass and the smell of two-stroke exhaust and new-cut lawn fills the air. Night (and all its mystery and magic) is coming swiftly on, but you and your pals are having a great game of football. The ball is perfect. Your laces are tied up tight and everything feels great. Your Mom comes out the door and says, "you have 10 minutes until you have to come in for dinner." Do you stop playing and fret until dinner? Or, do you play harder... to make the most you can out of those ten minutes... and secretly hope that maybe Mom will forget to call you for just a little longer?
10 Comments
Frequent Contributor
The way I remember it, I became completely absorbed into such moments. I had a way of entering a blissful dimension where I could perform amazing physical feats while the crowd cheered. Occasionally I would need a band aid and a cuddle, but mostly I was a real life hero. What's for dinner? H
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Contributor
Hi Harker, Its amazing how you remember the little details after being touched. I remember the lawn and lights in Rockhampton and the days and nights at the beach at Yeppoon.... What's for dinner! Well as a kid, hamburger nights and close second fish cakes and veggies....believe it or not? What's your fav dinner/s? Jules
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Super Contributor
Clever. I agree that we have the choice to stop living and sit and worry or keep doing what we like for as long as we are able.
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Frequent Contributor
On Sunday night we would have a tea cake or cheese on toast. We'd get back from the local oval just in time.
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Occasional Contributor
Sometime in the past 3 months I've seen or heard the comment/advice: "Do what you can". I think that's sound advice but I will also attempt to "Do what I want".
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Super Contributor
I like it, talljohn
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Contributor
As a kid I used to hanker over the first cut from a roasted leg of lamb & sometimes I got what I wanted. I suppose I could not make the roast so I did not have the choice of when it might come, but when it can my way it sure tasted extra good. Ps The rest of the roast was also good in various ways. I'm more a vego now but remember those days
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Deceased
G'day Teacake - now that brings back memories of special moments as a child. The bit off the roast leg of lamb, down the end right on the bone, sometimes crunchy and so full of flavour. Then getting to chew the bone of the leg after all the meat had been served hot for Sunday dinner, cold for Monday tea and then sliced up for sandwiches for the rest of the week. Almost as food as getting to lick the beaters when a cake was prepared or cream whipped. Use to fight my sister for that one! Those of course were the days of everything being made with butter, lots of eggs, courtesy of the backyard chooks, sponge cakes and cream. I don't think margarine was allowed in the house - after all we had to support those dairy farmers. All fruit from those backyard trees was shared between neighbours and vice versa so the cellar was always full of bottled fruit in Vacola jars, and numerous pots of jam. We had seven prolific plum trees and I don't think I can contemplate plum jam fifty years later. Dinner was always three course - dessert often preserved fruit, or fruit pies with cream or custard. Lots of memories - good ones. The counter balance is that although it was called good healthy food. My father had his fatal heart attack at aged 61! Sailor
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Frequent Contributor
As a hungry young male I could with one stare bore a hole in the head of a younger sibling who so much as looked at the shank end of a lamb roast. Terrible. Just terrible.
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Regular Contributor
Ahh memories! Harker you remind me of my brother who at 5 years older than me was a ravenous teenager when I was but a little tyke. He would hover over the plate"Are you going to finish that?" To spite him I would eat everything but a very polite friend was so intimidated that she would pass her half eaten plate to him. 45 years later she still rememebrs the time and the trauma! Sailor I too rememeber the Sunday roast and leftovers and sandwiches. The legs must have been huge in those days. There is certainly not much left in my house these days! We also always had dessert but my Dad is 85 and my Mum 84 so we must have found the balance between the cream and the ice cream and the fruit! S
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