So Far....So Good

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So Far....So Good

Greetings all. Well, the pages on my calendar are turning quickly. When I was diagnosed with prostate cancer in late November, I was saddled with the prospect of 37 radiation treatments. After today's hit, number 16, the number reduces. What started out as fear and loathing, not to mention total uncertainty, the journey is moving at good knots. I'm feeling confident. I'm feeling good. Sure, there's been some bodily reactions, uumm, well, it's been tolerable. No great trauma or drama. So if you're man, scared about what lies ahead, please feel free to write me. It's no understatement to say how I felt. I was petrified about the treatment, outcomes and my own ability to handle this. But I'm moving on, handling it, making friends and contacts buoyed by prospects that my life is going to get better. I wish you, me, and everyone here a glorious future. George.
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Re: So Far....So Good

So pleased to hear that things are progressing well for you George! Your positive attitude is such an asset, and I believe the people you are interacting with as your treatments progress, and those of us who read your optimistic posts, are really helped and encouraged by that. Look forward to hearing more good things as you enter this second half of your treatments! Smiley Happy
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ZOL
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Re: So Far....So Good

Hi George, Good to hear that you are progressing well with your radiation program. I completed 39 sessions of external beam radiation (2 Grays per session ) last July and even though I had minor bowel & peeing problems I am very pleased with the result. My diagnosos was: -Tumor: T3B Gleason Score: 9 PSA increased from 2 to 4 over 2 years testosterone; 7 Treatment: -6 mos Androgen injections -then 39 sessions of external radiation -then another 12 months of androgen injections (5 months to go) Results: Blood Tests -Aug 2015: PSA 0.03, Testosterone: 0.06...............In remission -Jan 2016: PSA 0.03. Testosterone 0.05................still in remission general comment: -side effects mild.......bowel movement 3 x times daily after radiation and settled back once daily 4 months later .......woke up 3 times nightly to pee for first 2 months post radiation, then selled back to once nightly .........hot flushes from androgen regular.......twice or so nightly and 4 or so during the day these cause tiredness but I am advised that these side effects are quite normal Prostate cancer is fed by testosterone so the role of the androgen injections is to minimise testosterone thereby reducing PSA which is the blood fingerprint of prostate cancer. The big test will be next August when I finish the Androgen injections and have the PSA & Testosterone test. If testosterone increases as expected and PSA remains low (sub 2) then I should be right. If not its back to the drawing board. George, have you been advised what your tumour rating is and what your Gleason score is. These values are crucial because the T rating indicates the extent of the cancer( T1 being mild and T4 being extensive after which N & M levels follow) and the Gleason Score indicates its rate of growth of which 2 is very low and 10 is extremely high. Most prostate cancers are slow growing (Gleason 6 or less) with low T ratings.) It seems now that radiation theraphy is having similar results to radical surgery with less side effects. Cheers George and dont worry if you get some minor side effects in the last week of radiation because, in my case, these cleared away over a few months. Also ask the hospital for the CD on strengthening the pelvic floor exercises. ZOL.
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Re: So Far....So Good

Free & Zol (and other lurkers, Thanks for your feedback, info and support. Happy to report, today marks 1/2 way in my treatment regime. Yay!! I'm going well, doing good. Happy daze ahead. My journey is daily inspiration, as I meet and talk with many who are/have done it hard. Your heart goes out, of course, and then you realize there is so much to smile about. The hassles of the euphemistic factory floor, climbing corporate ladders, and acquiring and hoarding assets mean little when the examined life is looked at hard. I now want to take photographs, build meaningful relationships and maybe learn to play a guitar. Sometimes the worst of times bring out the best experiences. Don't you think? George.
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Re: So Far....So Good

Morning George I had this years first blood test and have not managed to get to Perth for the results as yet. Unlike other patients who's PSA results are quite low I am not on hormones so my PSA is very slow to decrease and it took 6 months to get down to 4.4. I am a long way from Perth for the next 3 months so I have to wait until April to find out how I am doing. Keep smiling George
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Re: So Far....So Good

Greetings, hey, hi and hello. Thanks for the comments and the continued support. Appreciated. Very. All continues to go well for me, as I have now under three weeks' of radiation to go. Other than feeling tired, and that varies day to day, I'm travelling good albeit slightly slower. I have been so lucky in my experience. I received my diagnosis in November. I was sad, distressed and angry. And why not? After planning, scrimping and saving for three years, we were off to England for a five month bucket list -- Europe on tour, Wales, Ireland and Scotland by car. Scotland was important because I intended to scatter my mother's ashes there. So, as you can imagine, to have the C word blow up in your face, well, disheartening is a good word. But, as luck and prayer would have it, my "team" has indicated that we are going and we're on the plane in April. Excitement abounds. Finally. Now, sure, not everyone can bucket list their emotions and go on a trip. But having spoken to many people who are on the C journey, the secret seems to be finding a major distraction. And a big help, so I've found, in addition to trip planning, is to involve and interest yourself/ ourselves/myself in the welfare of others. When we move outside of ourselves and lock on to something other than ourselves, well, life offers us a richer tapestry than the often bland colours that our situation and circumstance can bring. It works for me. Maybe for you, too. I wish YOU the best. George.
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