My husband met with his oncologist yesterday who gave him the good news that his brain tumor had shrunk due to radiation treatment. We were so happy for a few minutes and then POW!!! he suggested very strongly that we need the Palliative Care Team to be involved NOW.My heart just sank from being on such a high and then swoop down to the lowest low and then stabilise. He has a scan next week to see if his lung cancer has spread,if not then his medical team will decide if a combination of radiation and chemo will help him be more comfortable.At the moment he is struggling. I have personally called this the 'Triple K' approach. K = Kiss (give some good news) K = Kick (give the bad news) K = Kiss (give something to soften the bad news) Just wanted to share my day. Gentle whispers of encouragement coming to all you brave people. Dotty
6 Comments
Super Contributor
I am so sorry for what is happening to you and your husband. I know many here will help you through this . All the best to you both.
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Occasional Contributor
Thank you for your support.
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Contributor
Frightening words, The Palliative Care Team. Its like a well placed kick in the guts, it leaves one feeling sick in the stomach. As a carer not a sufferer, when the dx came through it was Palliative Care straight away, no options, no choices. We did 48 rounds of chemo in 2yrs,once every 2 weeks. As we walked to chemo one time, my wife pointed the Hospice building out, the horror and the realisation that I felt, that in the not too distant future we would end up in there, I thought the end of my world had arrived. I had dropped into a big black hole and couldnt find a way out. This good for nothing disease of cancer is indifferent and shows no compassion. Good, bad, young or old it dosnt care,it just takes everything. As it turned out for us, we didnt even make it there. The final days came along so quickly the final moments were on us before we knew it. Which in a way was merciful. Never in a million lifetimes did I imagine that I may have to walk through the doors of a Hospice to visit a loved one. The mind has problems comprehending it. R I P my lovely girl Wombat4
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Occasional Contributor
Wombat4,thank you for your reply and you are describing what it is like for us at the moment.It is so scary!!!! The hospice where my husband may end up going is 25klms away and I hope he never gets there.I know he would not want that,so I will be asking for the care to be given at home. I am so sad this happened to your loved one. Gentle blessings, Dotty.
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Contributor
Hi! My husband has had his pal care team now for about 2 years...... They are great! They have given me support, brought toys for the kids, talked, assisted with his medical needs, but just been there......... We hopefully will have them for a long time yet, but they are great people who really know their stuff......the nurses can even give advice and advocate for the patient with the doctor in terms of drugs for pain etc..... They have been great! It is a scary word but it is the most specialized form of care I reckon there is....they are lovely, caring, very special people...... Thoughts and hugs coming your way! PA
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Occasional Contributor
Thanks PA,I know they will help me set up home to make it easier for my husband and me. As I said having the hospice so far away,home is the best alternative. I wish with all my heart Rex had 2 years left but his specialists have told us to be prepared sooner than later. May your husband have continued support,they sound wonderful. Gently gently, Dotty
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