Hi everyone, With my chemo now underway properly and some of the side effects starting to show, I was wondering if people could give me a little bit of advice. So far my side effects include hair loss, change of appetite and fatigue. The hair loss I can cope with. The change in appetite is something that I can work around so that I still eat properly. The fatigue is the one that I hope someone can give some advice about. With the fatigue, I know that part of it is to do with not having had a proper sleep routine for almost a fortnight. However, I am quite sure that there is some caused as a result of the chemo. Any advice greatly appreciated. Take care, Tim
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Frequent Contributor
I think chemo reduces the capacity of your blood cells to carry oxygen around your body, hence the fatigue. Either red or white, can't remember which. Too tired to remember. There's nothing to do but ride it out; reduce your expectations of daily life if need be. The week after chemo is the worst for blood levels I think.
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Deceased
Hi JS Once you have had cancer treatment fatigue never really leaves you. I don't want to be negative, but it is the reality and we all end up with our own way of coping with it. One of my friends describe her chemo treatment as being like having your head in fog and your feet in treacle. Both the fog and treacle thin a bit after a while, but they are always there. Find times you can catnap during the day. Look at ways to do things so that they require less effort. Above all look after yourself. Don't be afraid to indulge yourself a bit more. Cheers Sailor And inspirations that we deem our own, The rushing of the sea-tides of the soul; And inspirations, that we deem our own, Are some divine foreshadowing and foreseeing Of things beyond our reason or control. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
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Contributor
My husband found that light exercise, eg walking, which he then referred to as his 'daily stagger', was helpful in relation to keeping his fatigue 'manageable'. Sailor and Harker both offer good advice, don't be afraid to indulge yourself and reduce your expectations, things have changed...allow yourself to let your thinking change too. best wishes
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Contributor
Hi Tim, I agree that walking helps with the fatigue. I always felt better after exercise. It also helps with the emotional fatigue if you can get outside for even a short walk amongst the trees in a local park. Best wishes Allicat
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Regular Contributor
Sailor I thought after 4 years on from chemo that I was just reaching middlish/oldish age. For me the fatigue was always the worst part - I agree - the rest you can manage. I only coped with 'nanna naps' in the afternoon and accepting help from friends and not worrying if the housework wasn't done. I must admit I was able to let go of that fairly easily. Maybe a walk (not when it's too hot) followed by a 'nanna nap' may help make up for the poor sleep patterns. It's not easy. S
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Occasional Contributor
Thanks everyone. I think I knew what types of things were going to be said, just needed some confirmation of them. I think part of my problem for the first days following the chemo was I was still recovering from hospital and getting some normal routines established once again. I'm working on the appetite and making sure that I eat enough of the right foods and often enough (the whole eating thing has become a new experience - today for some reason I decided I wanted Macca's for lunch and I don't normally eat junk food). Things seem to have improved a little over the past couple of days. I have managed to get out and about to two different shopping centers on two different days (for about 4 hours at a time) and survived, although I must admit I needed a good long nanna nap today. The biggest problem I am going to face is learning how to slow down and take things a easier than I used to, but not slow down too much. Take care everyone Tim
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Regular Contributor
Hi Tim, I cannot stand Maccas normally - once a year when I am trully desperate and it is the only thing open. When I was on chemo I craved cheeseburgers - not just any Macas - had to be cheeseburgers. At least they were cheap! The slowing down is hard when you are used to being busy but just try to trust how you feel. good luck to you with it all. S
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New Contributor
Hello Tim I am a 35 year old male, my chemo finished almost a year ago. I agree with the above comments about exercise being one of the best ways of combating the fatigue. I struggled with the fatigue too and it is about managing it. I quickly became aware of what parts of the day i was most tired. Generally i was always good in the mornings but became very fatigued mid afternoon so i managed that by not setting any tasks to do during the fatigue. Note which parts of the day you generally feel knackered and make sure your somewhere where you can rest if you need to. Regards
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New Contributor
Hello Tim I am a 35 year old male, my chemo finished almost a year ago. I agree with the above comments about exercise being one of the best ways of combating the fatigue. I struggled with the fatigue too and it is about managing it. I quickly became aware of what parts of the day i was most tired. Generally i was always good in the mornings but became very fatigued mid afternoon so i managed that by not setting any tasks to do during the fatigue. Note which parts of the day you generally feel knackered and make sure your somewhere where you can rest if you need to. Regards
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Not applicable
We made sure her Vit. D, B12, E and Iron are well above the standard. In addition, she has learned how to eat small and regular meals with the last one at around 16.00 hours. Vit D was very low - now over 100 (has been taking 5000IU every day for 6 months - now every second day. Exercise and rest and make sure you get regular naps and quality sleep over night if you can. If you get high temperature - go to the hospital immediately. And garlic - get Aussie grown (purple organic) garlic. But do not chop it up, swallow one whole clove with a glass of water every 3 hours. It slowly releases allicin that way. She has been taking it every day since the surgery. Her weight before the Whipple's was 57kg. During the chemo - 48kg. Now, - 59kg. Good luck
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