Breast cancer and 2 gene mutations

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Visitor

Breast cancer and 2 gene mutations

Hello everyone!

Last year on 22 february I was officially diagnosed with breast cancer after biopsy. I had at least 3 tumors in my left breast and (lucky me, I guess) I accidentally felt one of them when I was touching the area between my breast and armpit. It was a shock, of course, because I just had my 30th birthday...

My dr recommended to test myself for gentic mutations. After 4 weeks the results came in: BRCA2 and Nibrin mutation. After that I was told the best option for me was double mastectomy with reconstruction.

My cancer was stage 1 with no lymph nodes affected, grade 2 and estrogen positive. 
Since then, all I can think about is my cancer coming back and hormonal treatment is making my life miserable. My liver is getting fat, I put some weight on, my night sweats are getting worse, my bones hurt so much sonetimes I have days I can barely walk, I have nausea and dizzines, my stomach hurts... my memory sucks and I can’t concentrate on my daily activities. Recently, my blood tests came back with some bad results... leukocytosis with lymphomonocytosis.

They  say I have an infection somewhere in my body, but I have a bad feeling I can’t get rid off. I know I may be paranoid, but still... I have every right to be worried.

I will do some mri scans and see what is going on... 

I’m just thinking about my 2 genes I have. Will my cancer come back? Or maybe another type of cancer?
Meanwhile, I have nightmares and I can barely sleep😕

1 REPLY 1
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Super Contributor

Re: Breast cancer and 2 gene mutations

Hi Crisutza,

Firstly, I'm sorry to hear about your diagnosis. I know that that 30 feels so young, but you're not alone.

 

Regarding the genetic testing, I'm assuming you are Australian and that you've had genetic counselling?

In Australia genetic testing usually requires that you undertake genetic counselling and they will help help you understand what the risks are and how to interpret these results and risks

 

https://www.alrc.gov.au/publication/essentially-yours-the-protection-of-human-genetic-information-in...

 

Regardless of what country you are in, I highly recommend that you contact a generic counsellor.

They will help you understand what the risks are, what your treatment options are and what monitoring should be put in place for you.

It's so worth while doing this. The future won't be ask dark when  you know all the facts and what your options are.

 

Let me know if you have further questions. Only too happy to help.

 

-sch

 

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