Hi everyone......I'm new to this site (Just signed up). As I began my cancer treatment early last November, I experienced all of the physical discomforts we are all very familiar with. Biopsies,blood tests, scans, pokes and prods and all of the wonderful side affects of chemotherapy. I am from SA and a long way from home as I continue treatment here in Melbourne. I am in temporary accomodation and often feel very alone and isolated. I have always been a very strong person on the emotional level, but now find that keeping a strong and determined state of mind is becoming increasingly difficult. I am just curious if anyone out there is prepared to share and discuss how they have dealt with the emotional aspects of fighting cancer? Look forward to hearing from you............ Peter.
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New Contributor
Hi Peter, I am on my second time around for this whole process, but this latest session has been really life changing for me, so I can relate to what you are saying. My latest session of treatments started in September last year. I was happily working as a teacher in a Northern Territory remote community. But this place was too far away from the doctors and hospital. So I had to resign from my job and lost my free accomodation which went with my job. I was forced to go to the nearest town for treatment, which is Darwin. My daughter lives in Darwin, so I thought that going to live with her would be ok and that I would get the emotional support I needed. Not so. I suddenly found that I spent all day and nearly every night on my own. The doctors and nurses at the hospital kept telling me that I was depressed. But I wasn't depressed. I just didn't want to deal with all this on my own and I just wanted someone to sit down and talk to me. I didn't really want to talk to friends, because I found that they didn't really understand or were not interested in hearing about what I am going through. After a couple of months, I moved out of my daughter's flat and I am now staying with a girlfriend. Her friendship didn't really make the difference to how I feel emotionally now, but she gave me a book to read which has helped me so much. Even if you are a person who does not read very much, this book (and I can suggest others too) will help you with your emotions, so please give it a try. The book is "You Can Heal Your Life" by Louise L. Hay. Louise had Cancer herself and she explains how to stay positive and get through this. You will be able to buy a new copy in the book shops and you should be able to find it at a local library. I spend most of my day in bed, so I have gone on to read other good books since finishing this one by Louise. So emotionally, I am in a much better place now than I was last November. I hope my suggestion helps, let me know how you are going. Cheers, Renee
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New Contributor
Hi Peter Welcome...! I was wondering why you are having your treatment in Melbourne? I too had - and still do have - a difficult time dealing with the emotional side of the cancer diagnosis and treatments. I don't know about you but initially there was that shock and panic to deal with and the fear. Then the treatment took off and that consumed my energy for a long time - I too had that feeling of isolation even though there was family around. I think this is a journey that is often a lonely one - that is why sites like this can help because you can talk to people that understand how you are feeling and know why you are feeling that way and want to help. In regard to your question on how to deal with the emotional side of cancer - this is also an individual thing. I didn't want to seek professional and put it off for a long time but since seeing a psychologist I have felt a bit better - at least I know there is someone I can go to and unload to about my true feelings and she will not judge me or critisize me. She also helps me to deal with my feelings. Honestly I can't say it is easy to work through the emotional side of this but I can say that it does get easier as time goes by....probably not something you can believe right now but it does. When I was having treatment I often rang the cancer help line (131120) as they are wonderful and were able to answer my many concerns and often helped me to regain a bit more perspective. Many times they were just there to listen. (it is very important to find someone you can talk to as you need to be able to talk about what you are experiencing) Take care ......and stay strong Kind regards, Willow
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Super Contributor
Hi Peter Ohhhhhhhhh i can relate to you being away from home. It is very tough but it does end, so just keep that end in sight! I liken the emotions that we go through as being on a rollercoaster. I found the treatment exacerbates any emotinos you are going through and it is tough to keep having a good attitude. Its fantastic that you are reaching out, Peter and i hope you find this site helpful. How much longer do you have left of your treatment? Cheers Julie
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Not applicable
On February 9th I have a CT scan in the morning and will be hooked up to my 5th infusion of chemo that afternoon. As soon as the Oncology team have viewed the pictures, I will be told of the future treatments ahead. warm regards and thank you for your kind words, Peter.
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Super Contributor
Hey Peter All the best for the 9th ... my scan is on the 25th and then to see mr onco bloke in the arvo i think thats the plan. I stayed at Perth and am from Bunbury which is over 200km away, not the same as you i know. Are you staying at a cancer council place or elsewhere? When i was in perth i stayed at a place called Milroy, which is absolutely lovely and set in bushland even though its in the city. Even though the surrounds were great it was still hard to be away from family and friends for such a long time (was two months for me). ok ... time for foodage here. Talk soon. Julie
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