Bone marrow transplant

Highlighted
New Member

Bone marrow transplant

Hi hope everyone is well. I wanted to ask if anyone has had a bone marrow transplant. My husband is diagnosed with MDS it is a pre Leukemia which turns into Accute leukaemia and only curative option is bone marrow transplant which he is booked in for next month.if anyone can help me which has been through a bone marrow transplant and what to expect.

3 REPLIES 3
Highlighted
Frequent Contributor

Re: Bone marrow transplant

Hello Sev76,

 

According to Mayo Clinic:

 

After your bone marrow transplant

When the new stem cells enter your body, they travel through your blood to your bone marrow. In time, they multiply and begin to make new, healthy blood cells. This is called engraftment. It usually takes several weeks before the number of blood cells in your body starts to return to normal. In some people, it may take longer.

 

In the days and weeks after your bone marrow transplant, you'll have blood tests and other tests to monitor your condition. You may need medicine to manage complications, such as nausea and diarrhea.

 

After your bone marrow transplant, you'll remain under close medical care. If you're experiencing infections or other complications, you may need to stay in the hospital for several days or sometimes longer. Depending on the type of transplant and the risk of complications, you'll need to remain near the hospital for several weeks to months to allow close monitoring.

 

You may also need periodic transfusions of red blood cells and platelets until your bone marrow begins producing enough of those cells on its own.

 

You may be at greater risk of infections or other complications for months to years after your transplant. You'll have periodic lifelong follow-up appointments with your doctor to monitor for late complications.

 

Medications

If your bone marrow transplant is using stem cells from a donor (allogeneic transplant), your doctors may prescribe medications to help prevent graft-versus-host disease and reduce your immune system's reaction (immunosuppressive medications).

 

After your transplant, it takes time for your immune system to recover. During this time, you may be given medications to prevent infections.

 

Diet and other lifestyle factors

After your bone marrow transplant, you may need to adjust your diet to stay healthy and to prevent excessive weight gain. Your nutrition specialist (dietitian) and other members of your transplant team will work with you to create a healthy-eating plan that meets your needs and complements your lifestyle. Your dietitian can also give you food suggestions to control side effects of chemotherapy and radiation, such as nausea.

 

Some of your dietitian's recommendations may include:

 

Following food safety guidelines to prevent foodborne infections

Eating a wide variety of healthy foods, including vegetables; fruits; whole grains; lean meats, poultry and fish; legumes; and healthy fats, such as olive oil

Limiting salt intake

Restricting alcohol

Avoiding grapefruit and grapefruit juice due to their effect on a group of immunosuppressive medications (calcineurin inhibitors)

After your bone marrow transplant, regular physical activity helps you control your weight, strengthen your bones, increase your endurance, strengthen your muscles and keep your heart healthy. As you recover, you can slowly increase your physical activity.

 

Taking steps to prevent cancer is even more important after your transplant. Don't smoke. Wear sunscreen when you're outside, and be sure to get the cancer screenings your doctor recommends.

 

Results

A bone marrow transplant can cure some diseases and put others into remission. Goals of a bone marrow transplant depend on your individual situation, but usually include controlling or curing your disease, extending your life, and improving your quality of life.

 

Some people complete bone marrow transplantation with few side effects and complications. Others experience numerous challenging problems, both short and long term. The severity of side effects and the success of the transplant vary from person to person and sometimes can be difficult to predict before the transplant.

 

It can be discouraging if significant challenges arise during the transplant process. However, it is sometimes helpful to remember that there are many survivors who also experienced some very difficult days during the transplant process but ultimately had successful transplants and have returned to normal activities with a good quality of life.

 

I hope everything went well.

Reply
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Contributor

Re: Bone marrow transplant

I am so saddened to hear that. Just be positive in life despite everything you've been going through. Once you choose hope, anything is possible.
Reply
0 Kudos
Highlighted
Occasional Contributor

Re: Bone marrow transplant

Get well soon and pray stronger! 

Reply
0 Kudos
Post new topic
Talk to a health professional
Cancer Council support and information 13 11 20Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Cancer Information and Support

Online resources and support

Access information about support services, online resources and a range of other materials.

Caring for someone with cancer?

Find out what resources and support services are available to assist you.