Hello....

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Hello....

Greetings all. Just a brief hi and hello. I'm a man. I'm aged 62. And I've just been diagnosed with prostate cancer. I haven't (yet) dissolved into a tearful mess....but there are days I think I might. My Gleason score is 6/7, and later this week I go for bone scans and a few prods and pulls, that are probably familiar to thise on this group. Why have I signed up here? Simple. I need to connect with people -- hopefully friends-- who can offer understanding and support, just as I will in return. So...the ride has begun. I'm buckled in. I hope it won't be too bumpy. Are we allowed to use first names here? If we are, I'm George. Talk soon?
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Re: Hello....

Gday George...Welcome to the group. I have been on here for a while now, and have made a few new friends and learnt a fair bit about this horrid desease.Although many of us suffer from different types of cancer, sometimes the overlapping of emotional and physical needs are beneficial.Dealing with, and keeping a positive attitude, help tolerate daily problems that arise, and the advise shared on side effects etc, are usually great. I`m a 59 year old, who has been on this slippery roller coaster ride for about 18 months now , and am lucky enough to be surrounded by close family and friends that help support me. I hope you find this group friendly and informative, and please, dont hesitate to make contact, even just for a chat.. Greg.
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Greg, Thanks so much for touching base. I wasn't sure how this all worked. Then when I got myself posted, I was wasn't sure if anyone would respond. So, appreciate you took time to write. I have only been diagnosed a week. My how your life turns in just a week. I'm pretty much text book emotionally -- angry, confused, uncertain , sad, slightly depressed and annoyed. Probably the symptoms of most big C winners. I'm okay though. I'm not a tearful mess, yet, and I seem not to have lost my sense of humour. The only downside is lack of sleep, as I tend to wake up and then THINK. This obviously disrupts the balance a bit. I saw the doctor yesterday and he has prescribed some pills to take the edge off, while allowing me to snore blissfully unaware. Anyhow...thank you again for concern and interest. I'm sure we'll talk more. Hope so. Warm regards and every success with your battle, George.
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Gday George..Yes...a lot of different emotions and physical problems (some small hills...others ...a bit harder) all come to the front in this journey.The biggest thing...well maybe Two....keep your sense of humor and a positive outlook. I draw a lot on this forum for others opinions, and find it consoling that many of my feeling are shared by others. I have been lucky with the sleep department whereas the Chemo/Immunotherapy etc have been enough to keep me in a deep slumber, but there have been a few 3 am starts staring at a computer screen! We hope all is going well for you and your journey. Greg & De ps. You can click "add me as a friend" or "send a private message" if you want to, and that way I get emails as well as your posts,so I know when you post....
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Re: Hello....

Hello Lawman I have prostate cancer and have not long finished Radiation Therapy and so the waiting period for blood testing watching the PSA level hopefully dropping away back to below 2 for me. 4.4 at last count and I am not sure what my Gleason score was as I do not have the paperwork in front of me. T2C is what my status is or was and have the small tattoos and gold beads to keep as a reminder of the 3 months spent away from home at the hospital in Perth. I did not go through any emotional stages seems I was quite acceptable of the results of the biopsy with 7 out of 14 coming back as positive. I did not have any hormone treatment and no MRI as there was some confusion coming from 3 different hospitals and I had no idea who was organizing what treatment. Get to be a friend of a cancer nurse as you will be talking to them about problems which you will have or blood results which you have questions about. Or the Doctor that pops up and wants things done that you have never heard of or met. Just take your time in deciding what treatment and search for what you think you may like to have done then consider what choices you really have when you get to talk to a specialist as Dr Google gives a number of various treatments for this cancer. Removal of the Prostate has it's problems and so has the radiation treatment to save it. So please take your time to consider the options before taking the next step.
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Re: Hello....

Greetings, Thank you for your kind words of support, and for taking the time to write. I'm only into the first 10 days of my diagnosis, so I'm a tad overwhelmed. Gladly, I'm not as sad as I thought I'd be -- but then I have seen the doctor and he's given me some "sleeping pills" that has silenced the head chatter. I've just had the Ct scan and a bone scan. Nest week I talk with the Urologist, shortly after the Radiologist. All this is such a damn inconvenience -- and I am truly prioritising its importance- but we have been saving for three years for our bucket list trip to Europe. Not the least of which, I'm to scatter my mother's ashes in Scotland. Sooooooooooooooooooo my plans were riding nice and smooth, booking this and paying for that, then BANG this hits. My Urologist has moved very fast. He bouys me with the firm hope we will be able to travel in late April. Sure hope so. Again, thanks for your kind words. Best wishes and every good thing.
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ZOL
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Re: Hello....

Hello Lawman, I was diagnosed with prostate cancer (Gleeson score 9 & Tumour T3B) just a year ago and I am no in remission. Age 70. There are two types of cancer patients; those who want to know everything about it and those who dont. I belong to the former kind but some of my friends who have had prostate cancer for a few years just dont want to know very much about it and simply leave it to their urologist and/or their radiation oncologist. In my case I researched and studied the condition and sought second opinions. My progress was as follows -PSA test indicated 4 (doubled in 2 years) -My GP referred me to a Urologist -digital exam , could not feel anything -he said that the usual proceedure was watchful waiting for 6 mos & then another blood test. -he also offered an MRI scan which showed 35 shadow on the left hemisphere -then had a biopsy which indicated 60% of prostate effected (Gleeson 9 & Tumour T3B) -had bone & soft tissue body scans and all were clear. -Then offered radiation (surgery had similar prognosis in my case but possible more side effects) -Then given androgen injections for 6 months (reduced testosterone from 8 to virtually zero) (testosterone feeds prostate cancer and androgen therapy reduces tumour) -after 4 months had gold seeds implanted to guide radiation. -then had 39 sessions of radiation (5 per week) @ 2 Grays per session. -6 weeks after radiation I had blood test (PSA 0.5 & Testosterone 0.03) -declared by Radiation Oncologist that I am in remission) -put on a further 12 months androgen injections with review every 4 months. Side effects: -nil until the last week of radiation; more frequent peeing and loose bowel movements -5 months later and these side effects still persist , albeit abit less" Comment: I have found that it of benefit to take ownership of one's own health; ask questions , read about prostate cancer, talk to others who "have been there and done that". I'm keenly aware that urologists who are the first specialist port of call tend towards radical surgery because that's their specialty remedy. In my case I had team of 6 made up of my urologist, radiation-oncologist, the lab specialist who did the biopsies, a radiation scientist & two others. In surgery there is convertional surgery or the robotised Divinci machine proceedure, Both can be nerve saving. In Radiation there is External Beam,(which I had) Bracky Seeds or Bracky Rods . The best advice that I can offer 12 months after my diagnosis is: (a) talk about it (b) dont over-think it once you have done the research (c) seek professional psychological advice if needed (d) join a gym and keep fit and stay socially in touch with friends and family. (e) Athough there is no emperical evidence to show that diet or vitamins are of any use; just eat well and relish your food and dont consume alcohol. Green tea is great. In my case I volunteered as a Volunteer Carer in the Cancer Ward of my local hospital and i find that very rewarding. Hope that helps. Cheers ZOL
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Hey Zol, Thank you for taking the time to offer your personal (and beneficial) account of your journey. Your sharing is greatly appreciated. I have a Gleason score of 7. I've met today with my urologist, and tomorrow I meet my radiologist, with the suggestion we will move to radiation (external). I read everywhere that radiation is done for five days at a time, yet my urologist is suggesting it will probably be for three days. I queried that, but he thinks three. I sure hope so. The distance from here to there -- home to hospital-- is a far drive. A packed lunch drive if you get my meaning. All my scans are back -- the cancer is localised in the prostate. So I am very, VERY relieved. Again, Zol, thank you for sharing. I wish you well on your journey. The very best to you, George.
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