Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

LJB
New Contributor

Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

Hi all, having recently (4 weeks ago) had a successful operation to remove 3 cancerous lesions from my liver (metastasis) I now turn my focus to chemo treatment in a couple of weeks time and a process I certainly don’t look forward to but know it’s the best option available to feel confident of a hopeful full recovery.

 

Hoping to hear any stories or thoughts from those who might have received chemo treatment involving Folfox6 modified (flourouracil, leucivorin, oxaliplatin).

What were the side effects experienced?

What can I expect?

Were you still able to work normally while treatment was going on?

 

I also have to wear a pump for two days after each chemo treatment to infuse the flourouracil. How did this make you feel and how easy is it to wear and go about normal things?

 

Feeling pretty anxious about it all so trying to reach out to anyone in a similar spot.

 

I had a primary bowel cancer last year that required surgery and now just completed surgery on a secondary bowel cancer of the liver. Fun times!

5 REPLIES 5
Frequent Contributor

Re: Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

Hi LJB,

About 18 months ago a tumour was found in my large bowel during a colonscopy. After surgery I underwent 12 rounds of FOLXFOX (folinic acid, fluorouracil (5FU) and  oxaliplatin).

 

It's my understand that most of the side effects are from the Oxaliplatin.

 

There are websites around that will list all of the potential side effects, but they are just that. Potential side effects. You are unlikely to have them all.

 

With each round of chemo, I found the side effects got a little bit worse.

I personally had neuropathy, fatigue, a sore mouth, a couple of allergic reactions to the oxaliplatin and an infection. The infection was just an upper respitory infection that drove my body temperature to 38.6 degrees, which meant I had to go back to hospital for a couple of days.

The pump was more just annoying than anything. No big deal there.

 

After round one, the only side effect was a slight tingling in the lips. After a couple more rounds, and then cold water felt like razor blades sliding down my throat. (tip: just drink warm water)

 

Through out all of this I managed to keep working full time (I'm early 40's and reasonably fit), and I have a young family.

 

Let me know if you have any other questions.

 

-sch

 

 

 

LJB
New Contributor

Re: Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

Thanks so much for sharing your experience sch, very helpful and informative as I look to begin my own treatment.

Hope you are doing ok.

 

LJB

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LJB
New Contributor

Re: Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

Just thought I would fire another question back out via this thread:

 

Any suggestions on ways to keep energy and diet strong throughout chemo treatment? Any tips would be beneficial.

anything I can do to best prepare for what is ahead - 12 rounds of treatment every 2 weeks for 6 months.

 

Keen to keep life as normal as possible throughout chemo treatment which starts in a couple of weeks, also accepting there are many unknowns right now in terms of how chemo will affect me.

 

Open to all suggestions on best ways to stay healthy, both in body and mind.

Super Contributor

Re: Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

LJB

l found scrambled eggs on toast my go to food during chemo also hospital sustagen blended with a banana was good ,you  will just have to listen to your body during treatment .yes you won’t know about side effects until you start chemo,reads like you have an open mind that’s good.

Frequent Contributor

Re: Chemo treatment - Folfox6 modified

Hi LJB,

There is evidence that exercise can help minimise the effects of nausea and chemotherapy induced neuropathy, and will also help with improved state of mind.

Of course, the exercises that you can do and duration will largely depend on your personal circuimstances.

So if you are able to, try and include some exercise in your daily life.

https://www.nccn.org/patients/resources/life_with_cancer/exercise.aspx

 

I'd also recommend keeping on top of the nausea with anti-nausea tablets (your oncologist can prescribe these). For myself, taking the tablets meant that I was more likely to exercise, which in turn helped with the nausea.

 

-sch

 

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