Study invite: Cancer in Loved Ones and Health Anxiety

Cancer Council Team

Study invite: Cancer in Loved Ones and Health Anxiety

Good afternoon all!

 

Researchers at UNSW Sydney (The University of New South Wales) are seeking volunteer research participants to learn about the relationship between having a loved one diagnosed with cancer and health anxiety.

 

Participants need to be aged over 18 years old and have had a loved one diagnosed with cancer. The study is also open open Australia-wide.

 

If you decide to take part, you would be asked to:

  • Complete online questionnaires at the beginning of the study (40 minutes) and three months later (20 mins)
  • You may also be asked to complete a telephone interview (15 min)

You can take part in the study by going to: https://unswpsy.au1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_1SP4tXnzhLlKAKN

 

Cheers,

Kate - Online Community Manager

Reply
0 Kudos
4 REPLIES 4
Occasional Visitor

Re: Study invite: Cancer in Loved Ones and Health Anxiety

Cannabis Isn’t Some Magical Anti-Cancer Agent…But It Might Help

 

Found this article and even the chances is slow a cure is still a cure.

Slowing the progress is good enough.

 

 

Reply
0 Kudos
Occasional Contributor

Re: Study invite: Cancer in Loved Ones and Health Anxiety

I’m happy to participate.

Reply
0 Kudos
Contributor

Re: Study invite: Cancer in Loved Ones and Health Anxiety

Hi @sophiewilson019,

 

Thanks for posting. You may also be interested in this article from Oncology News which looks at the current evidence for cannabis use in cancer: Does cannabis cure cancer? We asked an expert.

 

"Let’s start by asking what the medical efficacy might be. Contrary to what most people believe, medical uses of cannabis have been widely studied. A 2017 review by the National Academy of Science looked at over 10,000 studies. They found evidence for some applications of cannabis, including managing chronic pain and spasms associated with multiple sclerosis. There was also good evidence that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive ingredient in cannabis, can reduce the nausea caused by chemotherapy. Indeed, a synthetic form of THC, called dronabinol, has been prescribed for just this use for decades.

But, crucially, there is zero evidence that cannabis has any curative or even helpful impact on cancer, despite enthusiastic claims to the contrary."

 

Kind regards,

Margaret

Online community admin team

Reply
0 Kudos
Contributor

Re: Study invite: Cancer in Loved Ones and Health Anxiety

Hi @pdjones,

 

That's great. The link to get involved is in Kate's post.

 

Kind regards,

Margaret

Online Community Admin team

Reply
0 Kudos
Post new topic
Talk to a health professional
Cancer Council support and information 13 11 20Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Cancer Information and Support

Online resources and support

Access information about support services, online resources and a range of other materials.

Caring for someone with cancer?

Find out what resources and support services are available to assist you.