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Hello,I'm new to this forum, my (our) life has been turned upside down over the past four weeks.I have been diagnosed with Bowel Cancer which I did not know I had until four weeks ago.I'm married and have 3 children and one on the way so I'm hoping that I can find some answers here to what is ahead for us.Oldman
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Hi Oldman,Welcome to the forum. There's some good information available on the Cancer Council website which should give you a broad overview of what to expect.http://www.cancercouncil.com.au/html/patientsfamiliesfriends/typesofcancer/bowelcancer/downloads/und_bowelcancer.pdfThere's also a forum on this website specifically for people with bowel cancer. Hopefully we'll have some people who can share their experiences and give you a better idea of what might be ahead for you.Good luck!
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Thank you for the welcome. I have added some info to my home page I'm not sure how it works for you to have a look at?Oldman
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Yes indeed, I can have a look. In fact I had a look at your homepage just before I replied to you. Your homepage is shared with everyone who has registered and logged in. Basically I just clicked on your name from one of your posts. You can try the same with me as long as you're logged in.
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Boy do I understand how you feel.  In October I was diagnosed with breast cancer. I am 42 and have three children (20, 18 & 17).  The worst is the lack of control, one minute you have plans the next thing someone is telling you that will be spending a lot of time at a hospital and that your life is taking a new path. I too had just returned to work after a 6 month break and was looking forward to the extra cash and mental stimulation. Now I have chemo and radiation to contemplate.  Funny how your world flips in one word - cancer. I hope both our futures hold - little or no 'side effects', good news and long lives.
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Dear cmarti15,Thanks for posting I think that fear has been biggest side effect for me.I know that the treatment itself does not hurt but I still worry about going in there everyday.How are you children coping with this change and the new daily routine that awaits you?I'm starting to see a councilor tomorrow (Monday) for the first time because of my lack of motivation to fight this thing.Best Wishes for the futureoldman (kevin)
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Hi Kevin, I am 32, married with 2 young sons and was ( and still am ) really concerned about how this would affect them and what would happen if something happened to me, I think these feelings are all natural. After my surgery to remove the cancer the pathology results showed that the tumor was grade 3, larger than expected, was growing through lymph channels and also vascular invasion (growing through veins) I finished my treatment 12 months ago. I also had major surgery with a 2 week stay in hospital. I found that after the surgery I was really keen to get going with the chemo and radiotherapy and felt really positive, but after a week or two I started to feel fed up and at times felt like giving up. I think it is really common to have these feelings, the treatments really take it out of you.  I spoke to the social worker a couple of times which did help me to get some things off my chest which is really important. I think that there are a lot of things that I would not want to discuss with family as it may upset them. I dont know the status of your illness but try to keep up the fight you will come through. Just think every time you have a treatment that it is one more down count them off one by one. There is light at the end of the tunnel, you may feel terrible right now but it is amazing how we tend to recover and heal from these things and become accepting of any side effects and check ups. It does take time and the emotional side is something that stays with me & worst case scenarios sneak into my mind every now and then but I try to push them aside and just think of my family and live each day as it comes. After reading your last post I really felt for you. I hope hearing my story will help somehow. People do survive bad cancers and go on to live happy lives. Best wishes butterfly
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Dear Butterfly,what a cool name sure beats my oldman username. Well really I'm not that old I'm only43.On the 18th of September this year I found out that I had a T3 tumor in my bowel, this came totally out of the blue and as you said turned our family life upside down.We were on such a high as the month before we found out that baby number 4 happening (due in late march)I find it hard to get the word cancer out of my head it tends to be there all the time when my mind is idle, I tried to see the social worker today but she was busy.I think that I'm getting better with the treatment I think that the biggest side effect from it all is fear I think I have said that you know that there is no real pain from the radiation and the drugs but each day I dread going in there.Reading your post did help me have a much better day so thank you for taking the time to share with me your story.Best Wishes,Kevin (oldman)
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Hi Kevin My kids are coping too well. I have always been the disciplinarian, the person who solves problems and helps everyone deal with things, so I think they just assume I will cope and get on with it. This is good I know but occasionally a bit of tlc would be nice. I have 6 months of chemo starting 11 Dec 07 then 6 weeks of radiation along with Herceptin and Tamoxifen, which for a person who doesn't even take panadol, is a bit hard to contemplate.  I think the worst is not being in control and having your life taken over by treatments and appointments. The other thing is all of a sudden everywhere you look there is someone wearing a turban or talking of cancer - its seems there's no escape. Sometimes I wish we hadn't even told our families, as now I have to detail every appointment etc to them all.  Sometimes it would be nice to just forget about it and go back to precancer days. Anyway enough whining.  Chow Chris.
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Hi Kevin & Chris, How are you managing Kevin? I know what you mean about the fear thing. I find it ironic that you can have cancer, feel well and not know about it, then you go through all the treatments which actually make you sick! and all of a sudden you feel like you have cancer. It absolutely affects the whole family, older family members think about their own mortality and of course the fears they have for you, but I think kids can be the resilient ones, they bounce back really easily. It is quite a burden for them to have to live with though when they see their parent who looks otherwise pretty healthy all of a sudden feel ill and lose their hair. I used to say to my eldest son that the treatments have to make me sick so I can get better, he didnt really understand that but seemed to be happier with some explanation. Im sorry to hear about your diagnosis Chris. The treatments these days are coming along in leaps and bounds so the one thing we can all be sure of is receiving the best care. My mother is a breast cancer survivor and just reached the 10 year mark, said something really simple to me which has stuck in my head. "Dont forget that what you are thinking about you are becoming"   All the best Butterfly  
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